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+ Middle School Musical

It’s a spectacle to marvel at how far one person’s vision can stretch in order to create a masterpiece, and I find myself struck by the thought every time I’m...

Middle School Musical

It’s a spectacle to marvel at how far one person’s vision can stretch in order to create a masterpiece, and I find myself struck by the thought every time I’m thrown into a production. As the house lights went down on the opening night of the Middle School Musical, I remember thinking that Peter Pan was absolutely no different.

A multitude of students from Years 9 and 10 had somehow slipped, almost unconsciously, into perfect renditions of each role, and it made me think back to those weeks when the thought of a fully fledged production was just a flight of fancy. The thrum of anticipation during auditions had been completely transcended by an immaculately selected cast, and by the time everyone had taken up their positions on stage it was impossible to imagine anyone else in those respective roles. It’s just something that instils in you an enthralling belief in the magic of theatre.

The aforementioned enchantment also consisted of incredibly special moments, some of which were specific to the individual, while others were shared by the production cast and crew alike. Things like hearty war cries rising to crescendos in the back of people’s throats as we screamed our lungs out before and after each show; excited, whispered waves of ‘chookas’ that passed for good luck among everyone as we waited backstage; the inevitable lack of restraint that took hold of both cast and crew as we cheered on the stars from the wings. We jumped on—and screamed at—fellow cast members during choreographed fight scenes, decorated black brick walls with glow-in-the-dark tape and favourite quotes from the script, and had impromptu dance parties in the not-so-segregated changing rooms. All those gruelling weeks of rehearsals, late Sunday nights and constant occupational health-and-safety reminders all came to a head for three nights of fantastic performances.

It was a production born and bred of visionary sketches, the hum of sewing machines and the double-checking of each costume; sweltering waits in the rehearsal area practising makeup until the cast came back for changes, the endless hunt for bobby-pins and everyone vying for Mrs Ramsey’s approval; set changes and lighting checks, whispering to fellow crew members backstage and having a million different things to do at once; tuning instruments in the green-room-turned-music-pit, frantically skipping sections under Kim Spargo’s enviable direction and waving madly at the camera connected to the stage during pack-up despite not being able to hear the answering laughs of the actors; and stretching upstage while the actors were warming up, bringing Madison Lochert’s incredible visions to life and dancing through the smoke spilling out from foiled pipes.

So many thanks are owed to so many distinguished groups and individuals—the extremely talented cast; the astonishing costume group, makeup team and backstage crew; the unbelievable musicians and dancers; and the wonderful band of drama assistants. An especially big thanks to Mr Bruce who headed up the backstage team with his endless expertise; Mrs Hodgkison who looked after everyone and was with us every step of the way; Ms Dalton who fed many hungry mouths and managed to mother the entire cast and crew; Kim Spargo who led the musicians and singers while bringing absolutely invaluable passion, diligence and professionalism to the show; and last, but not least, Sharon Reynolds who made the most incredible debut of a production, worked so incredibly hard and made every single member of the cast feel at home. The entire production was magic, and nothing short of fairy dust swept through us all during the time we worked on it. And I can say, wholeheartedly, that the only regret any of us had, as actors, was being unable to watch the show ourselves. The wisdom, experience and relationships imparted to every one of us throughout the journey will stay with us all for a very, very long time. And, as a whole, we were definitely lucky enough to see this production for what it was—one big adventure.

Heloise
(Yr 10)

+ Grandparents Day

On the Friday of Week 8 in Term 3 the Year 7s of Pembroke School invited their grandparents and grandfriends along to Grandparents Day.

Grandparents Day

On the Friday of Week 8 in Term 3 the Year 7s of Pembroke School invited their grandparents and grandfriends along to Grandparents Day. Many grandparents had not seen beyond the border of the Middle School, so it was a great experience for them to finally see inside. This day also gave us another chance to connect with our grandparents. Some of the visitors were old scholars who were pleasantly surprised about how the School had changed since they had attended.

We greeted our grandparents at the Pavilion across the road. Here they helped themselves to a morning tea that consisted of sandwiches, fruit, pastries and muffins, with tea to go with it. Here we also gave our grandparents a brief on what was ahead of us.

Our grandparents were led to an assembly prepared especially for them, but not without passing the Medlin cupcake stall, where they (and their grandchildren) had a cupcake or two. In the end Medlin raised $924 for their charity the Childhood Cancer Association from purchases.

The assembly soon started with a welcoming musical number played by the Year 7 String Quartet comprising Timothy, Kevin and Adden. They played Pachelbel’s Canon in D, arranged by Timothy himself. Later on we also had another item performed by Marissa on the flute, playing Al’s Café. Both were amazing pieces that lightened up the assembly. Afterwards were speeches from Mr Lawry (in place of an absent Mr Thomson) and Mr Macpherson, sharing some wonderful memories of their grandparents. The students in the Year 7 English classes had been asked to write a letter to their grandparents. Cameron, Alice and Navah (reading for someone else) were chosen to read their letters out at the assembly. All the stories shared were very heartwarming.

To round out the assembly, a small presentation was given about the Cycle 4 Sam fundraiser the week before, with prizes given to Jem and Sophia for winning the virtual bike race in their age group.

Next, the grandparents were treated to a tour of the Middle School. They were shown around different areas of the campus including the Library, Technology Centre, Art rooms and Science labs. They were also allowed a sneak peak into Maths, English and Geography classes. They were all amazed at the vast facilities we had and were always comparing them to their schooldays.

At the end of lesson 3, it was time to say goodbye to our visitors. They all had a great time and loved seeing the environment that surrounds us every schooling day. I think that the students and grandfriends could both agree on what a wonderful School we are privileged to attend.

Thank you.

Amelia 
(Yr 7)

(To preview photo gallery, please click on a photo below).

+ Spanish Trip

On the Wednesday of the last week of Term 2, 18 Spanish students from Years 9–11, along with Ms McEwen, Mrs Garcia and Mr Izzo, departed from Adelaide Airport for...

Spanish Trip

On the Wednesday of the last week of Term 2, 18 Spanish students from Years 9–11, along with Ms McEwen, Mrs Garcia and Mr Izzo, departed from Adelaide Airport for the Pembroke Spanish study tour to Salamanca, a city in the north-west of Spain known for its ancient university founded in 1218.

After the 23-hour journey our weary group landed in Madrid, got on a bus and drove for another 2 hours to Salamanca. When we arrived we were quickly exposed to the heat of the Spanish summer. After getting used to seeing sunlight again, host families were introduced and everyone went to what were to be our new homes for the next 3 weeks. After this we were shown around Salamanca and the language school don Quijote where we would be studying Spanish during our trip.

Over the course of 3 weeks many excursions and activities were organised for the students by both our Pembroke teachers and the teachers from don Quijote. Among these were tours around Salamanca and its monuments, such as the two cathedrals, churches scattered around the city, the university buildings (old and new), and other unique buildings and attractions within the city.

We also travelled to different cities all around Spain. When we first arrived we were taken to some nearby historical towns such as Ávila, which we were told was affectionately named the ‘Great Wall of Spain’ due to the centuries-old defensive wall that surrounds the city. This was one of our first insights into the ancient buildings and culture of Spain that we would see in towns and cities across the country. Churches from the Gothic and Renaissance periods were a regular and astounding sight in all the cities that we visited, highlighting the rich, extensive history of Spain that we were to learn much about. Among our other visits were to Toledo, a city most notable for its majestic fortifications and metalworking; Granada, the home of the Alhambra, an ancient Arabian palace and one of the most well-known landmarks in the world; Madrid; Seville; and also Cáceres, a UNESCO World Heritage town said to have been founded by the Romans in 25 BC, almost 2000 years ago.

Some of the activities in Salamanca included cycling along the Río Tormes, walking around the city and, on the final day, a trip to the top of the cathedral, where the stunning views across the countryside managed to outweigh the dizzying height of the tower. Some spectacular pictures were taken in an opportunity to capture the beautiful Spanish landscape one last time.

When in Salamanca we attended classes most days and learnt the language in an environment where almost everyone spoke Spanish. This was of great help to our Spanish-speaking abilities, along with learning a lot about Spanish culture from people who lived there and participating in many cultural events. We were given the opportunity to explore the city after classes, and many groups of students took these opportunities to go shopping, spend time with new people, and look around the areas they might not have been to on tours.

Our trip was thoroughly enjoyed by all the students, taking away a wealth of new knowledge and great experiences. The trip gave us a valuable new perspective on how Spanish as a school subject can really be useful, and we all gained a greater enjoyment and understanding of the language due to this outstanding trip that our teachers and the School offered us.

Junee, Charlotte, Luca and Frank 
(all Yr 10)

(To preview photo gallery, please click on a photo below).

+ Year 10 Ski Trip

In the last week of the July holidays a group of 80 Year 10 students and nine teachers departed from Adelaide at 5.00 am Sunday morning for Mt Hotham, to...

Year 10 Ski Trip

In the last week of the July holidays a group of 80 Year 10 students and nine teachers departed from Adelaide at 5.00 am Sunday morning for Mt Hotham, to commence the ritual Year 10 Ski Trip. The atmosphere was flamboyant and energetic as many anticipated seeing snow for the first time, while those who were annual skiers couldn’t wait to get back on the slopes. After the short plane trip to Melbourne and the longer 5-hour bus trip up the mountain, sunny blue skies and crisp white snow awaited us. Dragging heavy suitcases through thick snow proved to be the first challenge of many for the week; however, once all were settled into one of the three lodges, Valhalla, Arrabri and Eiger, the music was blasted and the almighty card games began.

After muddling through the chaos of trying on hire gear, identifying the correct boots for skiers and snowboarders, and managing the morning rush to get to the bus on time, all students successfully made it to the top of the mountain for our first ski lesson. For the beginners the lessons were a fantastic way to learn the basics and build confidence in a new but safe environment. The intermediate and advanced ski groups quickly retained their ski legs and, with help from their instructors, were all hitting the black slopes in no time.

During the first afternoon we were hit with a bit of a blizzard and whiteout, so the majority of the students returned to their lodges. Michelin-star-quality 2-minute noodles and easy mac were a favourite for lunches, but as sunny weather returned on Wednesday and Thursday many chose to dine at Hotham Central to make the most of their time. Highlights from the trip included skiing with friends in the afternoon to show off newly gained tricks and improvement, night skiing on Wednesday and the much anticipated rounds of mafia in the lodges at night.

Torrential rain and 80-km winds deterred most people on the Friday morning, although a few brave, slightly delusional students went out armed with DIY waterproof garbage bags and rubber gloves. Although we missed a final chance to kiss the snow goodbye, everyone left in high spirits after one of the best weeks, where they were challenged and rewarded for hard work and effort on the slopes. It was such a fun week where new friendships were formed and new skills were developed, and everyone was very sad to leave. We encourage everyone to apply for the trip despite skiing ability or any doubts you may have. A huge thanks to Ms Reynolds and all the teachers for giving us the opportunity of a lifetime.

Lily
(Yr 10)

(To preview photo gallery, please click on a photo below).

+ Senior School Ski Trip

29 June 2016; Adelaide Airport; 46 Senior School students were heading off to the mountains of New Zealand’s South Island; the feeling of excitement was brewing.

Senior School Ski Trip

29 June 2016; Adelaide Airport; 46 Senior School students were heading off to the mountains of New Zealand’s South Island; the feeling of excitement was brewing. With everyone looking smart in their freshly ordered ski trip jumpers, the students were eager to get on to the slopes and show off their skills, professional or not so professional ... After disembarking the plane in Queenstown, we were greeted with fantastic weather and beautiful scenery. The sleepy bus drive to Wanaka showed us some of the scenic highlights that New Zealand has to offer.

The first day of skiing was at Cardrona. The mornings started with lessons provided by ski instructors from all around the world. We all had to get our ‘ski legs’ back, and the beginners had to learn the ins and outs of snow etiquette. After each extremely fun but exhausting day, we were treated to dinner out in the town. We were even lucky enough to go to the movies most nights at the Paradiso Cinema. The world-famous cookies that were freshly baked at intermission were a serious highlight! With the thought of those warm chocolate chip cookies as a reward, we worked all the harder at trying to improve our skills on the slopes.

The first half of the 9-day adventure was spent at Wanaka, before we moved on to Queenstown. Despite the snow quality on the slopes being less than ideal, this did not impact on the fantastic skiing and snowboarding experiences had by all at The Remarkables. Watching the sun rise over the mountain tops on the bus trip to the ski lifts was truly ‘remarkable’. With only a couple of injuries, the trip was an amazing success—all trip members arrived home exhausted but smiling!

A big thank you must go to the teachers who ran the trip—Ms Jones, Mr Lodge, Ms Hodgkison, Mr Mirtschin, Mr Shillabeer and of course Mrs Crowhurst, without whom this awesome trip wouldn’t go ahead as smoothly as it does each year.

Livvy  
(Yr 11)

(To preview photo gallery, please click on a photo below).

+ Year 12 SACE Drama

School Dance, performed in Wright Hall by the Year 12 SACE Drama class, was about facing your fears and coming out on top.

Year 12 SACE Drama

School Dance, performed in Wright Hall by the Year 12 SACE Drama class, was about facing your fears and coming out on top. The story took the audience on a nostalgic and often hilarious trip back to a time in the 1980s when the music was fun and the hair was big. The story revolves around three teenagers—Matt (Mark, Yr 12), an unco who turns invisible; Luke (Henry, Yr 12), a long-haired, BMX-riding film buff; and Jonathon (Nick, Yr 12), who loves dancing to Cyndi Lauper. They’re meeting up before a school dance but get drawn into the land of invisible teens inhabited by Danika (Olivia, Yr 12) and a bunch of ‘80s icons including a gremlin.

A hardworking and inventive group of student designers, managers and performers reminded us how challenging it can be to grow up when the world doesn’t see you. Congratulations to the whole cast and crew, and in particular director Ms Reynolds and student mentors Mrs Dalton and Mr Ferrier.

Mr Woon
Director of Drama

+ Year 5 Musical

Why do pirates make great singers? Because they hit the high C’s!

Year 5 Musical

Why do pirates make great singers? Because they hit the high C’s!

Excuse the pirate humour—it’s been a long semester! Producing a junior version of the classic Gilbert and Sullivan opera The Pirates of Penzance was no easy task, but everyone involved thoroughly enjoyed re-creating the fun and humour of the original. After many weeks of rehearsals and excitement, the Year 5 students performed for the School, and their family and friends at Scott Theatre, University of Adelaide, on 23 and 24 June.

Highlights for the children included being fitted for their bright costumes, having their make-up and hair done, using the microphones and performing in a professional setting. They developed a wide variety of skills during the process of preparing for the musical, such as cooperation, voice projection, dancing and singing. It gave me great pleasure to watch each student develop their own confidence and see how much they enjoyed being a part of the show.

I would like to thank the Year 5 teachers, the Junior School staff, Mrs Riley, Ms Corbett, Ms Lynelle and also Miss Van-den-Ende for all their support and assistance during the rehearsals and preparation for the musical. I would like to also thank all the Year 5 students for being so enthusiastic, diligent and imaginative. Congratulations, Year 5 students!

Miss Thomas
JS Drama Teacher

+ Music

Generations in JazzOn 6 May 55 enthusiastic Pembroke musicians again departed for the annual Generations in Jazz Festival in Mt Gambier.

Music

Generations in Jazz
On 6 May 55 enthusiastic Pembroke musicians again departed for the annual Generations in Jazz Festival in Mt Gambier. After a lengthy bus trip we settled into our hotel before attending the opening dinner of the Festival and introductory concert by James Morrison, Ross Irwin and friends. Saturday saw Big Bands 1 and 2 and the Jazz Choir compete along with another 163 bands and 84 choirs. This event certainly has grown! We were among the 5,000 student musicians attending from more than 100 schools from all over Australia and New Zealand. We had a successful weekend and heard some amazing and inspirational music! Big Band 1 placed 14th in Division 2, Big Band 2 placed 2nd in Division 4 and the Jazz Choir placed 2nd in Division 2. Brandon and Sofia were selected as part of the Division 4 Superband, a huge honour! It was a great weekend for all concerned.

Jazz Cabaret
Just 2 weeks later the Music Department hosted John Morrison and Andy Firth as guest artists for our Jazz Cabaret at the Arkaba Hotel. The guests played with each student ensemble—the Junior School Concert Band, String Orchestra, Concert Band, Big Bands 1 and 2, and the Jazz Choir. Outstanding musicianship by our guest stars dazzled the audience, with Andy Firth being a standout for many. Wow—can he play a clarinet! John Morrison joined with local musicians Sam Riley and David McEvoy to support the performances and brought an impressive level of class and musicianship to the event. It was a very pleasant evening for all involved.

Student Recitals
Students from the Junior, Middle and Senior Schools enjoyed the opportunity to perform in Recital evenings and the Junior School Soirée Concert. A wide range of styles and instruments were heard across these two evenings, and parents and students appreciated the opportunity to perform and demonstrate their skills.

Kaleidoscope Concert
On Wednesday 8 June students from the Middle and Senior Schools performed in DY Hall. A range of impressive ensembles that included the Percussion Ensembles as well as the Saxophone Ensembles; the Clarinet Trio (who dazzled people with their piece by Piazolla); and then after interval the Concert Band, Middle School Orchestra, String Orchestra and the Symphony Orchestra all demonstrated what they have been working on in a variety of Music presentations. Our thanks must go to the Friends of Music Committee for their provision and service of refreshments.

Mr Pope
Director of Music

+ Year 11 Group 4 Projects

Group 4 ProjectThe Group 4 project is a collaborative activity where students from different disciplines of Science (Biology, Physics, Chemistry and Sport Science) work together on a scientific or technological topic.

Year 11 Group 4 Projects

Group 4 Project
The Group 4 project is a collaborative activity where students from different disciplines of Science (Biology, Physics, Chemistry and Sport Science) work together on a scientific or technological topic. This year the topic was food science. This project allows students to gain an understanding of the relationships between scientific disciplines and their influence on other areas of knowledge. It was fascinating to see how my teammates from the different disciplines tackled problems in their own unique way.

Through this project the students learned how to effectively plan and carry out a practical experiment, including health and safety risks as well as the equipment needed.

After many hours spent planning and completing experiments, we presented our findings to the Junior School in a Science Fair.

I thought that this experience was invaluable—seeing the different ways to solve problems, the work that goes into organising experiments and the best way to communicate Science to younger children.

Alice
(Year 11)

The awesome science experiments
When I heard that the science experiments were going to be on food, I was really surprised. From the time I knew that to the time I went there, I wondered what the science experiments were going to be. My favourite science experiment was the one where you listened to different music and ate the same food. It was interesting to see how music influenced the way you tasted it. When I first came to the experiment I wondered why three students had IPods out. I soon learnt they were so they could play music. Even though I didn’t participate-which I regret now-I thought the experiment was really interesting. Everyone’s science experiments were really cool and even though I’m only in year four I’m still looking forward to doing it myself.

Elizabeth
(Yr 4)    

The food experiment
I really enjoyed looking at the experiments. It was really interesting seeing there is a lot of science in food as well and I usually just think of food as something you eat, not what you can do with it. I really liked one that we had to sniff something and then drink from a cup and the smell and colour made it taste different. I hope I get to do something similar when I’m older.

Phoebe
(Yr 4)

The spectacular senior school food-science exhibition
I loved the exhibition because I think that all of the different and unique experiments were very creative, smart, interacting and surprising. A lot of the junior school kids (including me) probably loved all of the interesting facts and properties of foods. It was very fun and exciting to visit the exhibition because I learned how to make a chocolate fountain, homemade ice-cream and I learned very fascinating facts and experiments to do with food. I am so surprised that the senior school students came up with these awesome ideas and prepared for a long time to present them to us. Thank you an enormous amount and I hope you do another exhibition soon. It was extremely wonderful of you.

James 
(Yr 4)

Senior School Science demonstration
I liked the stand where they put on music and gave you 3 different types of bread and you had to rate it out of 1-10. It was fun and healthier than most of the other stands and the bread was tasty. We also had to wear blindfolds so we couldn’t see what type of bread it was.

Amina
(Yr 4)

Food science
I liked the smartie station the best because you put a blindfold on, ate a smartie and tried to guess which you ate. Even if you didn’t put a blindfold on you could still eat a smartie. It was an interesting test. At all of the stations I liked how you could always eat or drink something even if you didn’t do a test. Also I liked how the year 11s and 12s explained each station otherwise I wouldn’t have known what the experiment was. Thank you for letting us come and have a fun time.

Lucy
(Yr 4)

Senior School Science
My favourite activity was the gluten bread dough one. We had to feel two types of bread dough and stretch them. Then we had we had to tell the year 11 students which one was the stretchiest. The year 11 students told us that the stretchiest one had gluten in it and the least stretchy one had no gluten. Then we had to wash our hands in some special liquid that got the gluten off our hands and then dry them with a towel. Then we got to have some delicious fairy bread. Another one I liked was the one you got to have ice cream that was very yummy. They told us how they made it. The way they made it was very interesting. All the other activities were also very cool. The science with food was awesome.

By Daniel
(Yr 4)     

 

 

+ Junior School Police Visit

This term the Receptions have been learning about being responsible. To help us explore this concept we visited the SAPOL Road Safety Centre in Thebarton in Week 4.

Junior School Police Visit

This term the Receptions have been learning about being responsible. To help us explore this concept we visited the SAPOL Road Safety Centre in Thebarton in Week 4. It was here that Senior Constable Matt guided us through various rules for when we are pedestrians on the footpath and taught us the road rules and signals for when we are riding a bike.

The children were all so excited to choose their own bike and helmet and it wasn’t long before we were let loose on the roads. For some children it was their very first bike ride! Luckily there were plenty of three-wheeled bikes and bikes with training wheels.

Those of us who were brave enough were pedestrians while the children negotiated roundabouts and traffic-light signals. A good day was had by all and will definitely be a highlight of our year.

Mrs de Wet-Cowland
Teacher

(To preview photo gallery, please click on a photo below).

+ Year 6 Camp

On Tuesday 1 March 2016 all the Year 6s travelled to Canberra by plane for three eventful days.

Year 6 Camp

On Tuesday 1 March 2016 all the Year 6s travelled to Canberra by plane for three eventful days. This camp was linked to our inquiry unit on Democracy, ‘How we Organise Ourselves’.

We were involved in many activities over the three days, including visiting Parliament House, the Australian National Gallery, the National War Memorial, the Australian Institute of Sport, Questacon and the Tent Embassy, as well as bowling and much more. At Parliament House we saw the House of Representatives and the Senate.

We were actually really lucky to be there during Question Time, when Members of Parliament ask the Government or the Opposition questions. It happens at 2 pm every day. We also saw the Leader of the Opposition, Bill Shorten, ask the Prime Minister, Malcolm Turnbull, a question and heard the Prime Minister answer.

One thing that was very fascinating about Parliament House was the way in which the architects designed it, with a large decorative fountain in the middle so that no one can enter that space. This is a symbolic representation of our democratic society. We also went to the Senate and watched a bill (which is an idea for a law) being passed through. Then we went to a role-playing room and re-enacted a bill being passed through. The bill was ‘should WiFi be on public transport?’.

After the three days we were sad to be leaving but felt grateful for all the fantastic experiences we had had!

Elijah and Mirella 
(both Yr 6)

(To preview photo gallery, please click on a photo below).

+ Year 7 Camps

It was a pleasure to attend the Year 7 Camps during Term 1 and I’d like to commend all the Year 7 students for their participation.

Year 7 Camps

It was a pleasure to attend the Year 7 Camps during Term 1 and I’d like to commend all the Year 7 students for their participation. They were an enthusiastic, positive and cooperative cohort of students and I look forward to working with them throughout this year.

The 3-day Year 7 camps were held at the School’s Outdoor Education property Old Watulunga, near Finniss.

The three main goals for the camps were for the students to:
• get know each other and their House tutors better;
• become familiar with the School’s Old Watulunga property; and
• participate in a range of challenging activities that encourage and help to develop the qualities of teamwork, cooperation and perseverance.

The activities included on the camps were:
• kayaking, raft-building, initiative tasks, and garden to plate (held at the Old Watulunga property);
• surfing and beach games (held at either Goolwa, Middleton or Port Elliot);
• night activities such as reflection and journaling, and a skit night (held at Old Watulunga); and
• high-ropes (held at Woodhouse, Piccadilly, in the Adelaide Hills).

The students were thoroughly engaged in a busy, active program and many tried new activities for the first time. They also set up and slept in tents, which added to the overall experience.
The garden to plate experience was new to the 2016 program and proved to be very successful. In this activity, under the instruction of Mr Langusch, students were actively involved in planting vegetables in the Old Watulunga vegetable garden, harvesting existing vegetables, and then chopping the vegetables to fill the Vietnamese cold rolls they had also produced. I can testify that the food was absolutely delicious!

The other new initiative for 2016 was the relocation of the high-ropes activity to Woodhouse. In this activity students worked in groups of six through an array of high-ropes elements at various heights through the magnificent pine forest within the Woodhouse facilities. This was an impressive conclusion to the camps; the qualities that the students had developed throughout the camp experience were clearly on show here.

In summary the camps were a huge success and I am very grateful for the support of many staff for their contributions and involvement. In particular I’d like to thank Mr Holland who assisted in the coordination and smooth running of the camps; Ms Thomas for organising and preparing such delicious food; Mr Lush for his invaluable support across all the camps; and the Year 7 tutors, Outdoor Education instructors and assistants for their excellent facilitation of each of the activities and their support of the students.

Mr Roberts
Assistant Head Middle School

(To preview photo gallery, please click on a photo below).

+ Year 12 IB Drama

The Year 12 IB Theatre class performed their self-devised piece ‘Atar’ (Spanish for ‘tether’) in the Black Box.

Year 12 IB Drama

The Year 12 IB Theatre class performed their self-devised piece ‘Atar’ (Spanish for ‘tether’) in the Black Box. Will, Zac, Sarah and Mika used the stimulus of a rope and the light to develop a story over a period of 8 weeks. The play, focusing on the idea that we as humans, unlike animals, have the choice to break away from convention in life, began with an interesting story about the training of young elephants and finished with a simple choice between work and love. The students had clearly drawn upon their experiences from the IB Theatre coursework of Physical Theatre, Theatre of the Absurd and plays such as Pina Bausch’s Nelken, Krapp’s Last Tape and Waiting for Godot.

Feedback from our audience expressed the following opinions:

‘Lovely contrast between the beauty of human spirit and the primal instinct of animals’.

‘Loved the use of AUSLAN, very powerful’.

‘The message for me was that in the end success is counted in the relationships we form’.

Mr Woon
Director of Drama

(To preview photo gallery, please click on a photo below).